SAT

SAT is a standardized test administered by the College Board and is required to be taken by students seeking admission to undergraduate schools.

The full form of SAT is the Scholastic Assessment Test, which was earlier known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test.The SAT is a standardized test meant to show schools how prepared you are for college by measuring key skills like reading comprehension,
computational ability, and clarity of expression.

Why must i take SAT

Because so many students take the test, it also provides schools with data about how you compare to your peers nationwide.You’ll almost certainly need to take the SAT or ACT if you’re applying to colleges or universities in the United States, since most require you to submit test scores with your application. Depending on where you want to apply,your ACT or SAT score can account for as much as 50% of the admission decision,so a strong standardized test score is vital.

What Does the SAT Cover?

The SAT has four sections, as well an optional essay. The first section will be Reading, followed by Writing and Language, then the no calculator section of Math, followed by the Math section you’re allowed a calculator on. If you decide to take the SAT essay, it’ll be the final section of the exam. Most SAT questions are multiple choice, but five questions on Math No Calculator and eight questions on Math Calculator will be grid-ins. When you take the SAT, you’ll get a 5-minute break after about every hour of testing. That means you’ll get a break after the Reading section and a second one after the Math No Calculator. If you’re taking the Essay section, you’ll also get a break before starting. The total time of the SAT is 3 hours if you don’t take the essay, and 3 hours and 50 minutes if you do take the essay.(sources:prescholar,2019)

How is SAT scored

The SAT score range is 400-1600 for your total score, and 200-800 for each of your two section scores. One section score is Math, while the other is a combined Reading and Writing score called Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (EBRW).